RODENTS/WILDLIFE

Wildlife control and damage mitigation often involve hazards such as working in cramped, hot and enclosed spaces. In addition, the target animals can present potential hazards such as biting, scratching, and the risk of being exposed to wildlife (zoonotic) diseases.

​Rodents are warm-blooded mammals that, like humans, can be found throughout the world. They have oversized front teeth for gnawing and check teeth, which are adapted for chewing. Rodents chew on a variety of items available to them and cause great damage in and around homes.

​Rodents tend to be rapid breeders. Some species breed year-round, and populations are maintained through constant reproduction. Because of the rodents’ body plan, they are capable of squeezing through spaces that appear to be much too small for them. All such holes should be sealed to prevent entry and reentry of rodents. A pest control professional should be contacted for assistance.

​Rats and mice are both extremely destructive within agricultural communities. A number of species feed on seeds and grains. The feces and urine of some rodents may contaminate surfaces with which they come into contact.

We GUARANTEE against ants.

We treat for FIRE ANTS at no extra charge.

We spray the FULL YARD during Spring and Summer

Birds

Bird-related problems can lead to lost business, contaminated products and expensive damage to building exteriors. Some bird species harbor diseases that can be transmitted to humans and are classified as public health threats. Bird droppings are also problematic, as bird waste can ruin building finishes and create unsanitary conditions. The droppings can also be expensive to clean up. If birds become a problem, contact your pest management professional and ask him or her to develop a bird control program specifically tailored for your home or business.

Professional Control

Habitat modification usually is the best long-term solution to bird control. Reducing food availability and access to protective shelter for roosting and nesting are the fundamental objectives of any bird control program.

​Bird control efforts begin with a comprehensive inspection by your pest management professional and, based on the inspection findings, he or she will identify the species of bird(s) and choose the most effective exclusion methods.

Some common methods of bird exclusion include installing exclusion devices on surfaces used by birds for roosting and loafing, plus using bird screening to prevent access to bird roosting and nesting sites. Your pest management professional will employ techniques and products that are humane, efficient and effective to the target birds.

Mice

Normally, the house mouse makes its home in farm fields, grassy and wooded areas, building nests in areas that are dark and protected from the elements and close to a readily available food source.

​Very inquisitive in nature, the house mouse will spend the day roaming its territory, exploring anything new or out of the ordinary. When available, the house mouse prefers seeds and nuts in its diet, but this opportunistic feeder will eat almost anything available.

​​When the temperatures outside begin to drop, house mice, since they don’t hibernate, begin searching for a warmer place to live. Often attracted by the smell of food and the warmth of a structure, the house mouse can use any opening, such as utility lines, pipe openings, and gaps beneath doors, to gain entry into a home.

Signs of an Infestation

Sightings

Although more commonly active in the evening, it is possible to see a house mouse roaming in your home during the day. Most often these animals are spotted scurrying along walls or running from a normally undisturbed hiding place.

Droppings

Where there are mice, there are droppings. These small pellets are commonly found anywhere the animals have visited or traveled. Approximately 3 to 6 mm long, the droppings may be rod shaped with pointed ends.

People may confuse house mouse droppings with those of the American cockroach. Even though the general size and appearance of these droppings are similar, mouse droppings usually have hair embedded in them from where the mice have groomed themselves. Roach droppings also are not pointed and usually have ridges running down the sides.

Footprints

As mice explore their territories, they often leave behind footprints or tracks on surfaces. The distinct pattern of a four-toed front foot and a five-toed back footprint are a clear sign that a mouse has passed by.

Gnawing/Chewing

House mice are known for their ability to chew on a wide variety of items. In most cases, shavings and a fresh accumulation of debris is often the first indication of damage. Teeth and gnaw marks can also be found along the edges of frequently traveled routes, on the corners of objects or creating openings into an area.

Burrows/Tunnels

House mice tend to build nests in material that provides a dark and protective environment, such as insulation and other soft materials. These nests are often characterized by openings or tunnels that are free of dust and cobwebs, but may be littered with droppings.

Sounds

During the evening hours, especially when it is dark and quiet, these small animals can often be heard gnawing and scratching within the walls, running across the ceiling and possibly squeaking.

Odor

House mouse urine plays an important role in communicating with other rodents. Oftentimes, rodents will mark an area to attract females or warn off other males. A distinct odor may become noticeable in an area with a large rodent population or when rodents have been present for a long time.

Cultural Control & Preventative Measures

Prevention methods should be implemented early in order to maintain a rodent-free home. Rodents reproduce rapidly, and small populations become full-blown infestations in very little time.

​Keep any possible food sources away from rodents. Small crumbs and garbage are popular sources of infestation, as are dry goods such as grains and cereals. These should be kept in sealed metal or glass containers to prevent contamination. Fruits and vegetables should also be stored properly, and resulting waste should never be left in sinks or on counters. Cardboard objects prove attractive to rodents, as they tend to chew them up for use in their nests.

*For more information on Professional Control services click HERE.

We GUARANTEE against ants.

We treat for FIRE ANTS at no extra charge.

We spray the FULL YARD during Spring and Summer

We GUARANTEE against ants.

We treat for FIRE ANTS at no extra charge.

We spray the FULL YARD during Spring and Summer

Rats

When rat populations are large, a hierarchy develops within a burrow. Stronger individuals become dominant, while weaker ones are subordinate. Males no longer protect female burrows. When a female is estrous, several males mate with her sequentially, in the order of their social dominance.

​Rats exhibit aggressive behavior when threatened. They may fight, chase, bite and box. Rats also display some behaviors such as sidling and belly-up defensive postures.

​Rats dwell in cities, suburbs and rural areas. They are capable of thriving in human environments are therefore are considered a commensal rodent. Rats are known to travel great distances and are wary of unknown objects in their established foraging paths. This skepticism can make trapping a rat particularly difficult for a homeowner.

​Rats are fairly opportunistic feeders. They will feed on a array of items from carcasses to fallen fruit. Human environments provide them an abundance of resources. Particular species of rat may have tendency for certain foods. Norway rats often prefer foods high in protein such as meat scraps or pet food. Roof rats usually prefer fruit, which is why people often refer to them as fruit rats. They may be attracted to areas with fruit tress.

​When living near humans, the availability of foods will drive a rodent’s habits. They often will travel outdoors and indoors searching for nutrition. They can take advantage of many food sources such as garbage cans, open containers of food, pet food bowls, and they will even cannibalize their own dead. Homeowners should try to eliminate or minimize the abundance of rodent food sources as well as contacting a pest control professional.

Signs of an Infestation

Rats are responsible for the transmission of many diseases. Their feeding habits are destructive, and their nesting behaviors can compromise the structure of infested buildings. However, rats are secretive and not seen by humans when populations are low. Therefore, an infestation may prove difficult to confirm.

​The most obvious sign of a rat infestation is the presence of dead or living rats. Rats prefer to hide, given enough space, so if rats are observed in plain sight, it is likely that a full-blown infestation already exists. When space becomes limited due to increased population, rats are forced out into the open. Rat droppings may be present, indicating a healthy, feeding rat population. Rats also tend to leave dirt or grease marks along walls and floorboards.

​If these obvious signs are not present, examine the surroundings for rat runs. These tracks are left in grass and low vegetation and act as foraging paths for rodents. Rats tend to follow the same paths after they have been established. Norway rats dwell in burrows found in grassy embankments, beneath the roots of trees and at the edges of paving and drain covers. Roof rat nests may also be found inside in lofts, attics, beneath floorboards and in other dark, infrequently visited locations.

​Rats gnaw incessantly on materials such as plastic and wood. The presence of damaged materials and large holes in floorboards and walls are sure signs of infestation. Rat teeth marks are large and rough in appearance.

​In the event of an infestation, it is best to consult a pest control professional. Although various traps are available, they address only individual specimens and will not prove effective in the face of an infestation. Additionally, rats tend to be wary of unknown objects in their established foraging paths, rendering many traps initially ineffective.

Cultural Control & Preventative Measures

Prevention methods should be implemented early in order to maintain a rodent-free home. Rodents reproduce rapidly, and small populations become full-blown infestations in very little time.

​Keep any possible food sources away from rodents. Small crumbs and garbage are popular sources of infestation, as are dry goods such as grains and cereals. These should be kept in sealed metal or glass containers to prevent contamination. Fruits and vegetables should also be stored properly, and resulting waste should never be left in sinks or on counters. Cardboard objects prove attractive to rodents, as they tend to chew them up for use in their nests.

*For more information on Professional Control services click HERE.

Squirrels

Tree squirrels generally nest within trees in wooded areas. As humans expand into natural areas, squirrels are forced to look for alternate means of lodging, including entering buildings. The most frequently invaded areas are garages and attics. Squirrels reach these areas by chewing holes in the exterior of the structure and typically nest, store food or both. Their activity is usually noisy and heard by anyone in close proximity.

​Tree squirrels are most active in the early morning and late afternoon hours. They spend this time in search of or storing food. A squirrel’s usual diet consists of fruit, bark, nuts, seeds, buds, leaves, bulbs and insects. If immediate nourishment isn’t needed, it will store the food in a cache for winter keeping. Flying squirrels, by exception, are primarily active at night.

​Ground squirrels typically do not climb into trees and can cause damage to crops, ornamentals and gardens. These can be trapped and relocated or controlled by rodenticides where permitted.

Signs of an Infestation

Aside from seeing the squirrels, signs include their gnaw damage, such as for food and nesting sites, as well as daytime sounds of their activity, such as in attics.

Cultural Control & Preventative Measures

Prevention methods should be implemented early in order to maintain a rodent-free home. Rodents reproduce rapidly, and small populations become full-blown infestations in very little time.

​Keep any possible food sources away from rodents. Small crumbs and garbage are popular sources of infestation, as are dry goods such as grains and cereals. These should be kept in sealed metal or glass containers to prevent contamination. Fruits and vegetables should also be stored properly, and resulting waste should never be left in sinks or on counters. Cardboard objects prove attractive to rodents, as they tend to chew them up for use in their nests.

*For more information on Professional Control services click HERE.

We GUARANTEE against ants.

We treat for FIRE ANTS at no extra charge.

We spray the FULL YARD during Spring and Summer

We GUARANTEE against ants.

We treat for FIRE ANTS at no extra charge.

We spray the FULL YARD during Spring and Summer

Snakes

Snakes have several different ways to kill prey. Snakes eat such animals as frogs, salamanders, insects, worms, small rodents and birds. Venomous snakes have sharp, hollow fangs designed to pierce skin and inject venom. They are located in the upper jaw with venom glands connected above. When not in use, the fangs fold back onto the mouth. Nonvenomous snakes use constriction to subdue their prey. They bite the prey and quickly wrap themselves around it. The snake applies pressure until the prey usually suffocates. Regardless the method of capture, the prey is consumed whole. The lower jaw is hinged and can open to surprising sizes, allowing the snake to consume prey larger than their mouth would otherwise accommodate.

​Snakes are cold-blooded animals, which is why they sun in the warmer months and go into hibernation during the colder. To help keep body temperatures from dropping too low, sometimes snakes will even hibernate in dens together, thus sharing the limited heat available.

Signs of an Infestation

All snakes should be treated with respect and left alone regardless of venom. Most venomous species in the U.S. are a type of pit viper, including copperheads and rattlesnakes. There are various ways to identify a pit viper from nonvenomous snakes. The physical differences focus on features of the head. Characteristics of the nonvenomous snake are narrow head, no pit between eye and nostril and round pupils. The pit vipers have a triangular shaped head, a prominent pit between eye and nostril and elliptical pupils. There are also tail differences. Of course, close examination of a snake of unknown type can be dangerous. Contact a professional wildlife management technician for positive identification.

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